• Tony Bosworth

Hawkesbury could lead the way with food waste revolution to benefit us all

Updated: Jan 14



Some 6% of global greenhouse gases are a result of food waste. That’s food being chucked away because we’ve put too much on our plates, or we haven’t eaten all we’ve bought, the use-by date comes around – all of these lead to food getting thrown out.


Once it gets to landfill and breaks down it produces methane, one of the most potent greenhouse gases, which is not a great result if you want to keep global warming down, but fortunately there is an answer and the good news is, the Hawkesbury is well placed to help.


Well known Bilpin local Matilda Julian has just put an online survey up as the first step to getting some solutions underway and she’s keen to get people on board with what she believes can be “a food waste revolution”.


“Rather than thinking that food has an 'end point' or expiry date, it can actually be the beginning of another product – for example, fertiliser, or another enterprise,” says Ms Julian.


Try not to waste food, but if you do have some, turn it into compost...


“Together we can really be part of the food waste revolution, and create what is called a 'circular economy'. Rather than thinking that climate solutions are going to burden us financially, they can be seen as an opportunity to develop small and large businesses that create and sell products, even energy.


“The Hawkesbury is in an incredible position to be able to offer opportunities for food waste and recycling - we live so close to a huge urban centre, so there’s heaps of waste, and we have the land, and agricultural industries surrounding us to create and benefit from up-cycling of food.”


Ms Julian says she’s lucky to already be part of a community enthusiastic about finding ways to help solve the issue.


“As Eric Brocken - our local infamous worm farmer - puts it – it’s about helping people to think circular rather than linear about food,” she says.


The idea of the survey is to gauge interest in workshops and activities around food waste as a first step to getting people involved.


“I would love to know what people are already doing, and their interest level,” says Ms Julian.


Compost can be used to enrich soil and making it is one way to solve the food waste issue...


Out of that research, she hopes to plan a series of workshops to help people skill-up, and to connect with like-minded people an hopefully have that lead on to some solutions.


“We want to encourage both big and small solutions. Solutions and skills for the home, schools and food businesses, as well as for larger enterprises that facilitate energy or fertiliser production, for example. The survey is to gauge the community's interest and find out where the opportunities and interest are.


“This is also about connecting people with each other, while also being attentive to how nature works, and being aware of the impacts and ways we can support our natural environment.


“One really simple thing that people can do in their own homes is reduce their food waste. It may sound like not much, but actually 6% of global greenhouse gases are a result of food waste.”


So jump on here where you’ll be connected to the survey, and get started. It could be the beginning of something big for the Hawkesbury – and maybe for you too - and will also help locals connect with each other and learn new things.







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